Good morning my loves!

I hope you had a lovely weekend and are feeling refreshed ready for the week ahead. This is not a scheduled post for me – not in the sense that it is Sunday evening as I write this and I’ve moved along tomorrow (today’s) scheduled post to make room for this one. Today, Booker Talk highlighted a post on a blog that I had never come across before. The post itself centered around several book bloggers and or instagrammers and how much it cost them per year. An interesting topic – I cannot deny that.

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There have been several comments on both the original post and on the tweet where the post was shared.  On the original post the comments are entirely positive – with most giving their thanks and appreciation. Meanwhile, on the tweet where the post was shared, we see the complete opposite – lots of bloggers not really understanding the post, or disagreeing entirely with the sentiment. Since I started writing this post, it has also spread to a couple of groups I’m in on Facebook and again, and much like the tweet, the majority of commenters disagree.

Now, I am not the voice of reason. I do not have all the answers. I am not always right. My opinion isn’t law. But. I feel, as a book blogger, I am allowed to have an opinion on this one myself. And well, I may as well chuck in my two cents. Just to put this one there. This is my opinion and mine alone. It’s okay to have a different opinion to me – the world would be a boring place if we all thought the same thing after all!

 

Cost versus Value

Okay, so I guess my point of view on this is simple. It’s the argument I consider when it comes to any passion or hobby (and I mean, that’s what being a book blogger is for most of us, isn’t it? Not quite the lucrative business one can pay the bills with).

What do you have to spend to be a book blogger? Not an awful lot really. Books are always a good place to start but let’s not forget there are libraries. So that’s one way of saving cash. Then, where do we post said reviews. Well, there are a myriad of places; Goodreads, Twitter, Instagram, Blogger, WordPress etc. All of which are free in the main, of course some off premium benefits, like Blogger and WordPress, but those are optional.

How much do I spend on blogging? I don’t think that is what is important here. I think the most important thing, at least for me, is the value of blogging. I’m going to try to as coherent as possible and keep the gushing to a minimum. Admittedly, I might struggle with that.

 

The Value of Blogging

For me, blogging has become one of the most valuable things in my life. I started blogging because reading can be lonely sometimes, and what I found was hundred of people who thought just like me. I found a community. I found a tribe. Whatever you want to call it.

I found a little space in the internet that welcomed me with open arms. I’ve found some of the sweetest people and can actually call them real life friends. I’ve been to book events, signings, blogger awards and soon I’ll chairing bookish events at Crickhowell Literary Festival. I’ve made connections with authors, booksellers and publicists, which I will always cherish. I’ve read some of the most incredible books I could ever have conceived of. Books which without a doubt I would not have discovered had it not been for blogging.

So, my final take away from this post is this; is my bank account a little more empty? Yes. Is my life so much fuller now? Without a shadow of a doubt – and I wouldn’t change a thing.

Peace and pages
Amy
X

13 thoughts on “The Cost of Book Blogging? My Response.

  1. Thanks for the mention Amy. I was really taken aback when I saw the original post with the results of the survey of bloggers. I got the sense that people were being ‘pushed’ into buying books purely because they needed to keep up with the latest releases so they could blog about them. What was sad was that there wasn’t any expression of joy or pleasure. And without that, what is the point of being a blogger???

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    1. You’ve hit the nail on the head there. It sounds like a chore, and an expensive one at that. Don’t get more wrong I spend more on books now than before I started blogging, but the pleasure I get from the whole experience far outweighs the cost (for me at least)

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It’s interesting how you interpreted the post. I really just thought the poster was trying to show how different bloggers spend different amounts when it comes to book blogging; so some bloggers might feel pressure to spend more, while others don’t. I didn’t think it was complaining about how much they spend.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. It is interesting how different people read the post. Maybe I was influenced by the comments made on the tweet. Is possible I may have read it another way if I’d read the post before those comments.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Great post. 🙂 I saw the initial post, the twitter thread and the responses and the division too. You are definitely right that you are allowed your own opinion as a book blogger!

    I think, for me, it’s as simple as blogging is a hobby. For most, it is an extension of reading which is itself a hobby and we blog because we read. That’s why posts like that get misunderstood as it comes across as blogging costs when, yeah, it is but it is reading costs too. Sure, you can pay for websites and props for instagram pictures which many do and they are a cost of blogging/bookstagram but books, obviously they are a cost and it seems weird when people complain or go on about the cost of books and how much they spend as that is their hobby. If you don’t want to buy books, don’t simple. Reading is a hobby, you have to buy the books, you would buy books if you didn’t have a blog. Blogging is a hobby but so are things like gaming, PS4 games cost around £40 for a new one, gaming is a hobby of mine, can’t complain about the cost of games as if I didn’t buy them I couldn’t game. Same for things like painting, you’d need to buy the brushes, the paints, the paper, other stuff, etc and it is all a cost. Cross-stitch and a whole myriad amount of other hobbies, too, all the sports ones you have to buy stuff for.

    So, I guess, there might be a cost for blogging, some more than others and none at all for some but it is a hobby and with a hobby, there is bound to be a cost that goes with it.

    Sorry, the comment got rather long, I apologies. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Like one commenter above, I also saw the post as a compilation of what the cost of blogging means to some people rather than just complaints about the costs of book blogging. I was really surprised to see an overwhelming amount of negative responses on Twitter, as though we are all in the same economic and geographic boats, so to speak. And I have to strongly disagree with the notion of “let’s not forget there are libraries” – this is definitely not the case for everyone. Furthermore, while I do agree that reading and blogging should be fun and enjoyable, neither of these hobbies or related opportunities exist in the same way for every blogger – to some, getting to a place of fun and enjoyment have greater costs.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree. So I know that I for example being a British blogger, have more opportunities than a blogger in say Asian countries. I can see the difference in being a blogger in Wales, and not London (where most of the opportunities happen), where it would cost hundreds of pound to get to – I should imagine it’s even more difficult for those who live further away from hubs such as London. I also know that a lot of places don’t have great libraries, some have libraries but funding is appalling and so they aren’t particularly great. Thank you for reading and commenting. I always appreciate a different perspective 🙂 X

      Liked by 1 person

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