May 2020 Reading Wrap-Up

Good morning my loves!

I’m baaaaaack! After taking a little bit of a break from blogging (and reading if truth be told), May has finally brought back my love for reading and chatting about books. Now, I read a LOT in May. 16 books at almost 4,500 pages. I would love to give them all a big review, but this post would be far too long. Keep your eyes peeled though because there will be some individual receives coming up soon. Now, on to the wrap-up!

2

The Adventure of Maud West, Lady Detective by Susannah Stapleton
A glimpse into the underbelly of ‘good society’ during the first half of the twentieth century, this is great non-fiction about one of Victorian London’s lady detectives. 4/5 stars.

Muse of Nightmares by Laini Taylor
The second and final book in the Strange the Dream duology, a philosophical fantasy. I loved the first book and this one just as much. Sad that it’s over! 5/5 stars.

On Earth Were Briefly Gorgeous by Ocean Vuong
An epistolary debut novel, written in the form of a letter from a Vietnamese American son to his illiterate mother. Heartbreaking and hopeful. 4/5 stars.

The Quickening** by Rhiannon Ward (published 20th August 2020)
Feminist gothic fiction set between the late 19th century and the early 20th century. Louisa is asked to photograph Clewer Hall and its contents for auction. Long-held secrets are unearthed and she finds that her own fate is entwined with Clewer Hall. 5/5 stars.

The Midnight Library** by Matt Haig (published 13th August 2020)
A heartwarming story from the genius that is Matt Haig, this book tells the story of Nora following an attempted suicide as she tried to answer the question; what is the best way to live? 5/5 stars.

Bookworm: A Memoir of Childhood Reading by Lucy Mangan
A journey through Lucy’s childhood via the books that she read. From Judith Kerr’s When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit to C.S. Lewis’ Chronicles of Narnia series, Bookworm is full of love and nostalgia. Sad that I didn’t gel with it more but I think that was doing to reading different childhood books. 3/5 stars.

Conan Doyle for the Defence by Margalit Fox
Another non-fiction true crime. Here we find Arthur Conon Doyle himself turning his formidable talents to solve a real-life crime and undo a miscarriage of justice. 4/5 stars.

The Murder of Harriet Monkton by Elizabeth Haynes
A good old fashioned whodunnit set in 1834. We follow a whole cast of unreliable characters after the death of Harriet Monkton, all who claim to be innocent. Someone is guilty, but who? 4/5 stars

 

1

A Registry of my Passage upon the Earth** by Daniel Mason
A collection of short stories spanning time and space, all of which have a deep connection to the earth. Beautifully written and always moving, this is a superb pick if you are looking for an impactful short story collection that will stay with you. 4/5 stars

The Iliad by Homer
After watching Natalie Haynes talk at Hay Festival, I decided to pick this up for the first time. I was not disappointed. Expensive and cinematic, definitely worth reading if you wish to know the basis for all of the Trojan War retellings that are out there. 4/5 stars.

The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander
Wow. I could not have predicted (well, actually I could have because it is all too commonplace) what would be happening in Minnesota right now when I started reading this. In The New Jim Crow, legal scholar Michelle Alexander argues that “we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it. A must-read for anyone with a conscience.  5/5 stars.

The Bass Rock by Evie Wyld
So highly recommended and described as a modern gothic triumph. The Bass Rock explores physical and psychological abuse in an incredibly insightful way. Beautifully written and deeply moving. 4/5 stars.

The Toll by Neal Shusterman
What a way to end The Arc of a Scythe trilogy. I am so very sad it is over. In a world that’s conquered death, will humanity finally be torn asunder by the immortal beings it created? A satisfying end to a brilliant YA fantasy series. 5/5 stars.

A Thousand Ships by Natalie Haynes
The story of the Trojan War retold entirely from the perspective of the women. Full of passion and wit, I adored this book, even more than I expected too. I will now read anything the Natalie publishes. 5/5 stars.

Perfectly Preventable Deaths by Deirdre Sullivan
An exploration of sisterhood, first love, and dark powers, this one held such promise for me. I really liked the plot, but sadly found the writing style a little lacking. 3/5 stars.

Wilder Girls by Rory Power
A story of survival and the power of female friendships, Wilder Girls was certainly that, wild. Intriguing plot and great characters, it was a great debut. 4/5 stars.

 

And there we have it, all of the books that I read in May. Have you read any of these? I would love to know what you thought of them, so leave a comment and let’s chat!

Peace and pages
Amy
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6 Replies to “May 2020 Reading Wrap-Up”

  1. Wow this is such an amazing collection of books! I cannot wait to read A Thousand Ships!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Ayunda says:

    4500 pages is amazing! Glad to see back in track ❤ I've been wanting to read Wilder Girls for a while, it's nice to see a good review of it.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Evie Jayne says:

    What an amazing reading month! I’ve read and loved so many of these books, and flew through The Midnight Library last month too: such an incredibly inspiring book. I’m also halfway through The Iliad atm and surprised at how readable it is!

    Evie x | http://www.eviejayne.co.uk

    Like

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